European Stone Festival 2013 – Lincoln, UK (21 to 23 June)

December 2nd, 2012 by Stone Carving News

European Stone Festival Lincoln 2013

From 21 to 23 June 2013, we will be welcoming over 130 young stonemasons and stone carvers from all over the world to the East Green of Lincoln Cathedral, United Kingdom, where they will have the opportunity to demonstrate their skills and creativity to a wide audience.

This year the thematic framework in 2013 is Food & Farming. The participant will be provided either limestone or sandstone.
Each stone measures 20cm x 30cm x 40cm.

Since the festival took place for the first time at the end of the nineties in Freiburg, it has become an annual event and been hosted by a variety of European countries.

Lincoln is closely associated with stonemasonry through its world-famous Cathedral. The organiser of this year’s festival will be the Lincoln Cathedral Works Department

If you are a stonemason or stone carver and are interested in taking part in the festival in Lincoln, simply fill out the application form and register by 1 April 2013. Whether you are an apprentice, a qualified mason or master mason, a stonemason or a carver, working for a company or self-employed, come and enjoy the special festival atmosphere as an active participant and meet masons from all over Europe.

Apply online here

Source: http://www.stein-festival.de/en/1_information/1.php

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Where to buy a tungten tipped box trammel?

December 14th, 2012 by Stone Carving News

Websites selling them:

RHG Travis & Sons

JP Masonry

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Student Winner to build Thomas Fowell Buxton Monument in Weymouth

June 17th, 2011 by Stone Carving News

Thomas Fowell Buxton Monument for Weymouth - Winning design by Peter Loizou

Peter Loizou of Weymouth College won a competition to design a monument to commemorate former Weymouth MP Thomas Fowell Buxton’s achievement in masterminding the abolition of slavery in the British empire in 1833.  Incidentally he’s the tall guy on the back of the 5 pound note!  It’s a fantastic opportunity for all the stonemasonry students at Weymouth, especially during the current economic climate,  to gain experience and contribute to something so prestigious!

John Fannon, the TFB Society Chairman, said: “I thought Peter’s design for the monument was absolutely fantastic. “It includes panels depicting Buxton from various periods in his life. “His choices for the monument were very appropriate and the Society had no hesitation in choosing him as the winner… This is a monument which will not date and it will grace Weymouth for many years to come on the Manor Roundabout.”

Peter said: “The story of Buxton’s life gave me the inspiration for the panels. “I will now be working on carving the monument which I hope will be complete in time for the 2012 Olympics… every masonry student at the college will contribute towards the completed monument.”

Source: http://www.thomasfowellbuxton.org.uk/news_items.html, http://www.viewfrompublishing.co.uk/news_view/10975/11/1/weymouth-student-winner-to-create-monument

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Get £10 off your copy of Warland

March 23rd, 2011 by Stone Carving News

Stoen Federation

The paperback edition of “Modern Practical Masonry” by E.G Warland is usually £35.00 but if you know someone who’s a Stone Federation member then you can get it for £25.00 (with free postage and packaging in the UK).  You can get even more off for orders of 5 or more.

Click here for more details.

It is a classic and remains one of the finest books ever published on the subject of stone masonry and is particularly valuable for its treatment of geometry detailing and setting out. It is also a valuable guide to the methods of masonry construction which were in use up to the middle of this century.

The book, which was first published in 1929 and lastly in 1953, aims to increase the craft knowledge amongst masonry apprentices, and is for the assistance of all who are actively connected with architectural and civil engineering masonry construction.

This work is the result of the author’s practical experience in the various branches of the craft, combined with several years comprehensive teaching of the subject. The writer has endeavoured to explain in a direct and simple manner the art of modern practical masonry and to illustrate by means of clear line drawings and photographs, the adaptation of masonry construction to suit modern building techniques. The information contained in the publication should also be of assistance to architects, structural engineers, civil engineers, surveyors, builders, building technicians and teachers of building subjects.

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Laser scan for Stonehenge stone carving secrets

March 11th, 2011 by Stone Carving News

BBC News

Stonehenge Stone Carving research

Stonehenge is being scanned using modern laser technology to search for hidden clues about how and why it was built.

All visible faces of the standing and fallen stones, many of which are obscured by lichen, will be surveyed.

Some ancient carvings have previously been found on the stones, including a famous Neolithic “dagger”.

The survey is already in progress and is expected to finish by the end of March.

“The surfaces of the stones of Stonehenge hold fascinating clues to the past,” said English Heritage archaeologist Dave Batchelor.

The team will be looking for ancient “rock art”, but also for more modern graffiti, in a comprehensive survey of the site.

Among those who have left their mark in the stones is “Wren” – thought to be Sir Christopher Wren, the architect who designed London’s St Paul’s Cathedral.

Wren’s family had a home nearby, where he is known to have spent time, adding credibility to the claim.

The new survey will be the most accurate digital model ever for the world famous prehistoric monument, measuring details and irregularities on the stone surfaces to a resolution of 0.5mm.

The previous survey in 1993 was photographic, and only measured to an accuracy of about 2cm.

“This new survey will capture a lot more information on the subtleties of the monument and its surrounding landscape,” said Paul Bryan, head of geospatial surveys at English Heritage.

English Heritage has proposed a new £25m visitor centre at Stonehenge and closing parts of the A344, which runs just yards away from the landmark.

Government funding was withdrawn last year, but the Heritage Lottery Fund has promised £10m. English Heritage is seeking additional funds and is confident of raising the money it needs.

Original source: http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/science-environment-12688085

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Three large stone carved panels commissioned for launch of Portland’s new Tesco

March 3rd, 2011 by Stone Carving News

Stone Carving - John Goodliffe, Peter Loizou and Ian Chalmers

Weymouth College celebrated the opening of the new Tesco store in Portland, which showcases the work of its former stonemasonry student John Goodliffe, who produced three large carved panels to depict aspects of Portland life.  College students Ian Chalmers and Peter Loizou assisted Mr Goodliffe to complete the friezes, each weighing over half a tonne, which have been installed in the wall on Park Road opposite the Health Centre. Master stonemason Mr Goodliffe said: “They are the most ambitious work I’ve done to date, I feel great satisfaction. “They speak of the spirit and determination of Portlanders.”

Photos of the work in progress can be found here.

Work

The central motif shows a huge diamond tipped stone-cutting sam, a symbolf of the primary industry on the island.  The Dreadnaught on the left records the close association of Portlanders with the Royal Navy.  An old battleship still lies in the harbour mouth where is was scuppered to provide a barrier against U-Boats in WWI.  Lastly the  traction engine (widely used in quarries) remembers George White who was crushed to death by his load after losing control when the pinion broke.  Rather than save himself he deliberately maneuvered the stricken rig so as to avoid hitting children just leaving school.

Stone carved panel - Tesco Portland

Portlanders

This frieze is inspired by the collection of family photos in the Portland Museum (1850s to 1950s). The scenes are historic  but is  about continuity with the past.

Stone carved panel - Tesco Portland

Lighthouses and Derricks

This frieze depicts the iconic, internationally known, Portland Bill.  It shows the three lighthouses and a typical derrick, now used to raise small boats but in the past used to load stone onto lighters.

Stone carved panel - Tesco Portland

Original sources: http://www.dorsetecho.co.uk/news/8867574.Portland_s_new_Tesco_celebrates_official_launch/?action=complain&cid=9173128 and http://www.weymouth.ac.uk/news/news-detail-view/select/construction_allied_trades_department/article/43/portland-life-stone-carving-adorns-new-tesco-store.html

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The MEMO Project

March 3rd, 2011 by Peter Loizou

Stone Carving - The MEMO Project

The project to commemorate the world’s extinct species. MEMO is an educational charity dedicated to building an ongoing memorial to extinct species.

The memorial will be a stone monument bearing the images of all the species of plants and animals known to have gone extinct in modern times. It will incorporate a bell to be tolled for all extinct species, including the great many ‘unknown’ species which it is believed perish each year unseen by scientists. The bell will be tolled on the International Day of Biodiversity on 22nd May each year.

On the outside of the monument there will be marvellous patterns of simple units based on the forms of microorganisms to be carved by thousands of secondary school children.

The ideal site for the monument is the Isle of Portland, part of the UNESCO World Heritage ‘Jurassic coast’, where an extraordinary clifftop site has been offered.

The first four carvings were on show at St. Paul’s Cathedral last summer before being exhibited at London Zoo. This summer they will be on display at Lyme Regis and on Portland. Soon a further six will be completed. The aim is to have the 800 carvings necessary to get the monument built up to date (together with the big bell and the education centre) by 2012 when the world’s journalists arrive on Portland for the Olympic sailing.

If you feel like helping out or want to donate, visit the MEMO website at http://www.memoproject.org. There is also a Facebook page www.facebook.com/pages/The-MEMO-Project/78945066503.

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Stonemasonry Drawing Techniques – Other ways to draw a volute (continued)

March 2nd, 2011 by Peter Loizou

A rule for drawing the spiral lines of the volute of the Ionic order.

Take your compasses and extend from “i” in the eye of the volute, to the greatest extent, and sweep with them a quarter of a circle; then holding still in the point where the compasses ended the quarter circle, bring the other point of the compasses to “2” in the eye of the volute; there sweep another quarter of a circle, still holding your compasses in that point; bring the other point of your compasses to “3” in the eye of the volute, and sweep another quarter of a circle, then hold your compasses in that point, and bring the other point of your compasses to “4” in the eye of the volute, then sweep the other quarter; so by this means you will complete one round of the volute: then proceed in the same manner from “4”, to “5”, “6”, “7”, and so on to “12”. take notice of the eye of the volute at large, and observe to divide each division into three equal parts, as is done between “2” and “6”, and let the point of your compass be placed in the points c, d, f, etc., to diminish the fillet of the volute.

Click on image to enlarge:

Stone Carving - Drawing a Volute

Original source: http://www.furniturestyles.net/european/english/patterns/director/spiral-volute.htm

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Stonemasonry Drawing Techniques – Other ways to draw the Volute

March 2nd, 2011 by Peter Loizou

Click on post title to see the full article.

This post is from the book “The New Metal Worker Pattern Book”, by George Watson Kittredge.  It is also also available from Amazon –  The New Metal Worker Pattern Book: A Treatise On the Principles and Practice of Pattern Cutting As Applied to Sheet Metal Work" target="_blank">The new metal worker pattern book.

The New Metal Worker Pattern Book: A Treatise On the Principles and Practice of Pattern Cutting As Applied to Sheet Metal Work">

The volute is an architectural figure of a geometrical nature based upon the spiral, and is of quite frequent occurrence in one form or another, consequently some remarks upon the different methods of drawing it will not be out of place.

81. To Draw a Simple Volute. – Let D A, in Fig. 225, be the width of a scroll or other member for which it is desired to draw a volute termination. Draw the line D 1, in length equal to three times D A, as shown by D A, A B and B 1. From the point 1 draw 1 2 at right angles to D 1, and in length equal to two-thirds the width of the scroll – that is, to two-thirds of D A. From 2 draw the line 2 3 perpendicular to 1 2, and in length equal to three-quarters of 1 2. Draw the diagonal line 1 3. From 2 draw a line perpendicular to 1 3, as shown by 2 4, indefinitely. From 3 draw a line perpendicular to 2 3, producing it until it cuts the line 2 4 in the point 4. From 4 draw a line perpendicular to 3 4, producing it until it meets the line 1 3 in the point 5. In like manner draw 5 6 and 6 7. The points 1, 2, 3, 4, etc., thus obtained are the centers by which the curve of the volute is struck. From 1 as center, and with 1 D as radius, describe the quarter circle D C. Then from 2 as center, and 2 C as radius, describe the quarter circle C F, and so continue using the centers in their numerical order until the curve intersects with the other curve beginning at A and struck from the same centers, thus completing the figure, as shown.

82. To Draw an Ionic Volute. – Draw the line A B, Fig. 226, equal to the hight of the required volute, and divide it into seven equal parts. From the third division draw the line 3 C, and from a point on this line at any convenient distance from A B describe ft circle, the diameter of which shall equal one of the seven divisions of the line A B. This circle forms the eye of the volute. In order to show its dimensions, etc., it is enlarged in Fig. 227. A square, D E F G, is constructed, and the diagonals G E and F D are drawn. F E is bisected at the point 1, and the line 1 2 is drawn parallel to G E. The line 2 3 is then drawn indefinitely from 2 parallel to F D, cutting G E in the point H. The distance from H to the center of the circle O is divided into three equal parts, as shown by H a b O. The triangle 2 O 1 is formed. On the line O H set off a point, as c, at a distance from O equal to one-half of one of the three equal parts into which O H has been divided. From c draw the line c 3 parallel to 1 O, producing it until it cuts 2 3 in the point 3. From 3 draw the line 3 4 parallel to G E indefinitely. From the point c draw a line c 4 parallel to 2 O, cutting the line 3 4 in the point 4, completing the triangle c 3 4 From 4 draw the line 4 5 parallel to F D, meeting 1 O in the point 5. From 5 draw the line 5 6 parallel to G E, meeting the line 2 O in the point 6. From 6 draw the line, G 7 parallel to F D, meeting the line c 3 in the point 7.

Fig. 225. – To Draw a Simple Volute.
Stone Carving - To draw an Ionic volute

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Stonemasonry students get AutoCAD for free!

March 1st, 2011 by Peter Loizou

Autodesk - Education Community

No joke!  If you are at an academic institution and have a valid verifiable student email address then you can sign up to the Autodesk Education Community. Basically you can download heaps of fantastic software for free (even the new AutoCAD for Mac users out there!) until of course you leave the course.

Follow this link to get started http://students.autodesk.com

Thank you Autodesk!!!

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